Mimosa Rocks National Park

Araganu1Mimosa Rocks National Park embraces 20 km of coastline and covers an area of 5,802 ha. Its diverse system of lagoons, beaches, sea caves, headlands, offshore stacks combined with spotted gums (Corymbia maculata) and prehistoric burrawangs are a feature of the park.

Yuin People have occupied this region for at least 6000 years. By that time, the sea had risen to its present level establishing a new range of hunting grounds including the Bega River estuary and three coastal lagoons either within or adjacent to the park.

It is, however, thought that Aboriginal occupation of the district could date back over the past 25,000 years. Today the major archaeological remains of this occupation are found in middens and open camp site deposits.

For travel information click here. For more detailed information on the park click here.

 

2015.picnicpoint.camp1Camping and staying over

Camping facilities are available at Aragunnu, Picnic Point, Middle Beach (walk in facilities only) and Gillards Beach. Bring drinking water in as there is none available at these areas. Gillards Beach is the only camping area suitable for caravans. Fees apply and are collected on site.

You can also step back to the 70s and stay at Myer House, an architecturally designed home that boasts sleeping for 12, tennis court and beach and lagoon access.

For further information on camping click here.

Nelsons Lagoon, Mimosa Rocks National Park

Facilities

Picnic facilities are provided at Picnic Point, Bithry Inlet and Middle Beach. Short walking tracks are in place at some locations to provide visitors with access around the area.

Look out for visitor information displays at Middle Beach, Bithry Inlet and Aragunnu.

Recreation

The combination of lagoon and ocean beaches often adjacent to one another makes Mimosa Rocks an ideal area in which to explore and enjoy the local coastal environment. For information on walking tracks click here. 

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Flora and Fauna

A number of threatened fauna species are found within the park including the sooty owl, golden tipped bat and hooded plover. The brown pigeon is found at the southern limit of its distribution.

Vegetation in the park falls into two main types: the forest communities of the western section and the coastal estuarine communities close to the ocean.

In the west of the park, forests are dominated by eucalypts with occasional pockets of warm temperate rainforest. These lands were formerly reserved as state forest. They were added to the park as a result of an important research project in the late 1970s (the Five Forests Study) aimed at determining the impact of woodchipping on fauna communities.

Along the coast can be found a variety of plant communities including a scientifically significant area around Bunga Head in the north of the park. Here several rainforest plants are found at the southern limit of their distribution in addition to heathlands containing a rare Correa species.

The estuaries and lagoons along the park’s coastline also contain important wetlands. These are highly significant areas for nature conservation providing habitat and food for a range of waterbirds (both local and migratory).

In helping to maintain the ecosystems of the coastal lakes and lagoons, wetlands also play a vital role in protecting oyster habitat and the nursery grounds of prawns, and a range of commercial fish species.

Aboriginal Heritage

pic_mimosa3Aboriginal people have occupied this region for at least 6000 years. By that time, the sea had risen to its present level establishing a new range of hunting grounds including the Bega River estuary and three coastal lagoons either within or adjacent to the park.

It is, however, thought that Aboriginal occupation of the district could date back over the past 25,000 years. Today the major archaeological remains of this occupation are found in middens and open camp site deposits.

The settlement of the Bega Valley in the 1840s quickly saw the Aboriginal community and culture decline. The area of Mimosa Rocks National Park is part of the territory of the Yuin people, which extended along the coast and hinterland. It is understood that coastal people had regular contact with the people of the Monaro Tableland and that there was fairly frequent two way movement between the coast and the tablelands.

Exploitation of coastal foods by inland people,and vice versa seems to have been part of the economy of the people of the two areas. It is probable that there were people from both groups living in the areas all year round. Many of the descendants of the Yuin people live in local towns and on land owned by the Aboriginal community at Wallaga Lake.

Location and Access

Mimosa Rocks National Park is located 420 km south of Sydney, 220 km south east of Canberra and 22 km north east of Bega. Access to the park is via the gravel roads which lead off from the Bermagui – Tathra Rd. These roads may become impassable after heavy rain.

Topographic Maps

Murrah 8924-IV-N | Bega 8824-I-S | Eden 8823-I-N | Kiah 8823-I-S

For more detailed information on Mimosa Rocks please click here.

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