The ideal antidote to modern life

There’s a multitude of places for you to pitch a tent or park the camper and spend a few days camping in our coastal wilderness.

Some parks are just a few minutes drive from the A1 highway, others are more isolated and require careful planning and a good amount of bushwalking.

Ben Boyd National Park

Sapphire Coast, South Coast

Bittangabee Bay, Ben Boyd National Park

Saltwater Creek and Bittangabee Bay campgrounds are south of the fishing port of Eden and surrounded by Aboriginal and European cultural heritage.

Bitangabee has around 30 sites, and its sheltered cove is beautiful and soaked in history. A place of safe anchorage for mariners and fishermen, it was also used as a port for the construction of nearby Green Cape Light Station and ruins still remain, including an old railway which carted building materials 9 kilometres south to the light station (You can also stay in the light house cottages at Green Cape)

Saltwater has 14 camp sites and its beach is more exposed to swell, and bordered by small estuaries perfect for kayaking and fishing.

Both grounds have fireplaces and amenities and lie on the  Light to Light Walk (32 kilometres).

Ben Boyd National Park

Saltwater Creek

Vehicle access is on unsealed road via Edrom Road, 26 kilometres south of Eden. Bookings are required during summer and Easter school holidays.

Walk-in camping is available at Hegartys Bay. More localised information from National Parks and Wildlife Services here.


Mimosa Rocks National Park

Aragannu Campground, Mimosa Rocks National Park

Aragannu Campground, Mimosa Rocks National Park

Sleep among the spotted gums and explore lagoons and long white beaches by day. Camping facilities are available at Aragunnu (a cultural site that is wheelchair accessible carpark and boardwalk), Picnic Point, Middle Beach (walk-in facilities only) and Gillards Beach.

Aragunnu has four distinct camping areas with around 50 sites, and they are suitable for camper trailers. A beautiful place rich in earth and Aboriginal history, and bordered by a stunning coastline.

Picnic Point has room for around 18 campsites, some with elevated coastal views. The grounds are set between two beaches, offering shelter no matter what the weather.

Picnic Point Campground, Mimosa Rocks National Park

Picnic Point Campground, Mimosa Rocks National Park

Gillards Beach is the only camping area suitable for caravans and has around 70 sites. The beach can be rough, with strong rips and currents. Fees apply and are collected on site.

Carpark, toilets and barbecues are available at all, but bring your own water.

More localised information from National Parks and Wildlife Services here.

Bournda National Park

Wallagoot Lake, Bournda National Park

Wallagoot Lake, Bournda National Park

Hobart Beach campground has 66 sites (unpowered) suitable for car-based and caravan camping.

It is the only park with showers and also has gas barbecues and a basic laundry. It is located by Wallagoot Lake with a short walk to Bournda Beach. Bookings are required during summer and Easter school holidays.

More localised information from National Parks and Wildlife Services here.

Nadgee Nature Reserve

Mallacoota Coastal Walk.

Mallacoota Coastal Walk, Nadgee Nature Reserve.

Overnight camping here is an incredible experience, but it’s not for the feint hearted – walk-in camping only!

That means you have to carry everything you need, including water and a fuel stove. Camping spots for the experienced bushwalker are Newtons Beach, the Merrica River mouth, Little Creek estuary, the northern and southern ends of Nadgee Beach, Nadgee Flat, the northern side of Nadgee Lake, Bunyip Hole near Cape Howe and the southern end of Cape Howe Beach.

More localised information from National parks and Wildlife Services here.

 

 

 

 

Spotlights